Rather than scrolling past a dozen positive comments and lingering on the sole exception, what if you did the opposite? And what if you shared a couple of the good ones with friends instead of sharing the one that hurt you? Research shows that it takes more time for positive experiences to become lodged in our long-term memory, so it’s not just pleasurable to dwell on a compliment — it’s shrewd.

Psychologist’s advice on how to handle the cruelty of Web trolls 
()
4 notes

The Student Loan Crusader: How Elizabeth Warren Wants to Reduce Debt

Mad, burnin’ love for this woman’s straight talk. No other way to describe it.

()
2 notes

The Future of College?

This program, Minerva, is the latest effort to save students cash by blowing up higher ed, coming behind Khan Academy and Coursera. I applaud any effort to turn academia on its head, though the cynic in me thinks universities will continue to plod along unchanged, much like a lot of mainstream newsrooms. Here’s to the brave ones, though.

()
1 note

Robin Williams on the Game of Golf

Priceless. RIP Mork. 

()
65 notes

For marketers and advertisers, page views still have value because it’s a standard metric, accepted by everybody. For the journalists, and more broadly the newsrooms, the most valuable metrics are without doubt those based on attention, the time that a reader spends reading and thinking about the content. We know there are ways other than just ‘time spent’ to verify the level of attention, such as the interaction with the content, scrolling, touch of the mouse – but when it comes to the readers, trust is the metric. … We shouldn’t discuss dismissing page views, but rather combining them with other metrics.

Andrea Iannuzzi, exec editor of national content for newspaper network at Gruppo Espresso, on the careful use of audience analytics
()
4 notes

When Jarvis started blogging after 9/11, he said, ‘People started communicating with me, and I realized that the proper structure for media is a conversation among people, and that wasn’t the structure we had.’

CUNY prof Jeff Jarvis reflecting on 25 years of Web journalism 
()
3 notes

They cheated American families, crashed the economy, got bailed out, and now the biggest banks are even bigger than they were when they got too big to fail in 2008! … A kid gets caught with a few ounces of pot and goes to jail, but a big bank launders drug money and no one gets arrested. The game is rigged!

Elizabeth Warren addressing NetRoots Nation Conference, Detroit
()
34 notes
This “news” just in …

This “news” just in …

()
4 notes

So, I say to [newspaper] publishers: Invest in a superb, in-depth, last-all-week Sunday (or better yet, Saturday) paper, a publication so big and rich and engaging that readers will devour it piece by piece over many days, and pay a good price for that pleasure. Get together with each other and consolidate your printing operations, creating one independent print-and-deliver contractor in each geographic region who can shed the outdated and outsized costs of your legacy operations. Then turn your attention and your resources where they belong now: Creating meaningful, engaging and sustainable news products for emerging technologies, where most of you are already woefully behind such innovative rivals as Vox and Vice.

Dave Boardman, dean of Temple University School of Media and Communication, calling BS on latest spin about the future of printed daily newspapers
()
5 notes

Weird Al Yankovic's Grammar Parody of "Blurred Lines"

My favorite thing on the Web this hour. I’m playing this bad boy next time I teach grammar, yo.

()
26 notes

Reflections from Co-Creator of TV's "Halt and Catch"

Completely digging this show about Texas’ computer industry in the early-80s and the reverse engineering of an IBM. Smart, riveting characters and cool throw-backs to the culture of my teens. Today’s bonus? Reflections from one of the show’s co-creators. If you haven’t watched the series, binge and get on it. Seriously, who’d have thought a show about a sociopathic visionary could be so beguiling? Kudos to the writers of that stuff

()

I’m not suggesting that news organizations turn a blind eye on staffer tweets. … You don’t want them libeling people. You don’t want them spewing racist bilge. But neither do you want to sew them into social media straitjackets that deter all expression. Such uniform and restrictive gag orders don’t expunge opinion from newsrooms, they only suppress it, and encourage journalists to find other oblique ways to convey their views. The social media straitjacket also infantilizes experienced news consumers, who have plenty of experience judging journalism and journalists, and who benefit when reporters and editors can tweet what is on their minds and what they are reading without being handcuffed and charged.

Media columnist Jack Shafer, on Twitter panic in newsrooms
()
3 notes