They cheated American families, crashed the economy, got bailed out, and now the biggest banks are even bigger than they were when they got too big to fail in 2008! … A kid gets caught with a few ounces of pot and goes to jail, but a big bank launders drug money and no one gets arrested. The game is rigged!

Elizabeth Warren addressing NetRoots Nation Conference, Detroit
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This “news” just in …

This “news” just in …

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So, I say to [newspaper] publishers: Invest in a superb, in-depth, last-all-week Sunday (or better yet, Saturday) paper, a publication so big and rich and engaging that readers will devour it piece by piece over many days, and pay a good price for that pleasure. Get together with each other and consolidate your printing operations, creating one independent print-and-deliver contractor in each geographic region who can shed the outdated and outsized costs of your legacy operations. Then turn your attention and your resources where they belong now: Creating meaningful, engaging and sustainable news products for emerging technologies, where most of you are already woefully behind such innovative rivals as Vox and Vice.

Dave Boardman, dean of Temple University School of Media and Communication, calling BS on latest spin about the future of printed daily newspapers
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Weird Al Yankovic's Grammar Parody of "Blurred Lines"

My favorite thing on the Web this hour. I’m playing this bad boy next time I teach grammar, yo.

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Reflections from Co-Creator of TV's "Halt and Catch"

Completely digging this show about Texas’ computer industry in the early-80s and the reverse engineering of an IBM. Smart, riveting characters and cool throw-backs to the culture of my teens. Today’s bonus? Reflections from one of the show’s co-creators. If you haven’t watched the series, binge and get on it. Seriously, who’d have thought a show about a sociopathic visionary could be so beguiling? Kudos to the writers of that stuff

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I’m not suggesting that news organizations turn a blind eye on staffer tweets. … You don’t want them libeling people. You don’t want them spewing racist bilge. But neither do you want to sew them into social media straitjackets that deter all expression. Such uniform and restrictive gag orders don’t expunge opinion from newsrooms, they only suppress it, and encourage journalists to find other oblique ways to convey their views. The social media straitjacket also infantilizes experienced news consumers, who have plenty of experience judging journalism and journalists, and who benefit when reporters and editors can tweet what is on their minds and what they are reading without being handcuffed and charged.

Media columnist Jack Shafer, on Twitter panic in newsrooms
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Both Vox and FiveThirtyEight are publishing new stories, blog posts, and explanatory pieces nonstop. As any news organization nowadays, they live in a 24/7 world. They need to feed the goat, as their business models seem to be based on attracting adequately large audiences. … It is tempting for a news startup to try to be both BuzzFeed and The Economist at the same time, no matter how chimerical that goal is. Lighthearted blahblah can be done quickly and nonchalantly. Proper analytical journalism can’t. If you have a small organization, you may have to choose between producing a lot of bad stuff or publishing just a small amount of excellent stories.

Data visualization professor Alberto Cairo, on what he sees as worrisome trends in data journalism
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I wuv you, ‘merica.  (at Marine Park (Tacoma Waterfront))

I wuv you, ‘merica. (at Marine Park (Tacoma Waterfront))

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Was researching best brands on Twitter for an upcoming social media workshop and came across this pigeon poop smack-down from Smart Car. See more hilarity here on sassiest brands around. Dope.

Was researching best brands on Twitter for an upcoming social media workshop and came across this pigeon poop smack-down from Smart Car. See more hilarity here on sassiest brands around. Dope.

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npr:

"Why 140 Characters, When One Will Do? Tracing The Emoji Evolution"
Image: NPR

This is one of my new obsessions, and there’s hard research to be gotten. One of the best research talks I attended at the recent International Communication Association conference in Seattle was a study on how teachers use emoticons with students. (Not surprisingly, there’s a point at which too many emoticons makes you look like dingbat.)
For the record, the 12-year-old boy in me is especially taken with the, ahem, dog dung emoji on my iPhone. Sums up the roughest days. Whatever — sue me.

npr:

"Why 140 Characters, When One Will Do? Tracing The Emoji Evolution"

Image: NPR

This is one of my new obsessions, and there’s hard research to be gotten. One of the best research talks I attended at the recent International Communication Association conference in Seattle was a study on how teachers use emoticons with students. (Not surprisingly, there’s a point at which too many emoticons makes you look like dingbat.)

For the record, the 12-year-old boy in me is especially taken with the, ahem, dog dung emoji on my iPhone. Sums up the roughest days. Whatever — sue me.

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It is unimaginable that a pharmaceutical firm would be allowed to randomly, secretly sneak an experimental drug, no matter how mild, into the drinks of hundreds of thousands of people, just to see what happens, without ever telling those people. Imagine a pharmaceutical researcher saying, “I was only looking at a narrow research question, so I don’t know if my drug harmed anyone, and I haven’t bothered to find out.” Unfortunately, this seems to be an acceptable attitude when it comes to experimenting with people over social networks. It needs to change.

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